Your Accommodation

2.jpg__350x200_q85_crop_subject_location-2216,1206_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg When touring the D-Day battlefields with Normandy Battle Tours you have the unique opportunity of sampling a slice of authentic rural Normandy, staying with your guide, right in the heart of where the D-Day action took place. 1 Le Port is a charming 17th century cottage which has been recently renovated into a comfortable and traditionally styled bed and breakfast. Here your group will have the exclusive use of up to 3 double bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms and an additional single bedroom. Complete with a spacious dining room with a farmhouse dining table seating up to eight people, a lounge with two big comfortable sofas, a large flat-screen TV, a DVD player and a library of books and DVDs relevant to your tour, we are confident that the whole group will love staying at what so many guests have called their  'home away from home'.

Bedroom one at 1 Le Port (sleeping up to 3 people) is the largest of the four bedrooms and contains one king size and one single sleigh bed as well as a triple wardrobe, one bedside cupboard and a three drawer chest along with a two-seater sofa. The en-suite bathroom has a shower above a bathtub, a washbasin and wc. Bedroom two (sleeping up to two people), as pictured, has a king size bed, two bedside cupboards, a suitcase stand. The en-suite bathroom has both a bathtub and separate shower cubicle and washbasin. This room also has a hanging rail and separate ensuite wc. Bedroom three (sleeping up to two people) has a double bed, a bedside cupboard, a hanging rail and en-suite bathroom with bathtub, washbasin and wc. If needed, the smallest bedroom (sleeping one person), the only single room in the house, has a single bed and hanging rail. Although the single does not have its own en-suite bathroom, it has exclusive use of an adjacent shower room - as our residential tours are normally limited to groups of a maximum of six people, very rarely do we have to use the single room - it is however always available if your group wishes a little more space in order to relax.

In addition to these four very comfortable and tastefully decorated bedrooms, you will enjoy exclusive use of the dining room which has a large farmhouse table seating up to eight people, an open fireplace, a wood burning stove, a farmhouse dresser and a large comfortable leather sofa. Hot and cold drinks are always available as you have full use of the property's kitchen and also the building's lounge which contains two large sofas, a large flat screen TV and a collection of books and DVDs relevant to the region. Outside there is plenty of room to sit and enjoy the peace and tranquility of rural Normandy. A half-acre garden including a seating area and brick barbeque are at your disposal during your stay which we guarantee provides an experience as comfortable and as authentic to the region as you can get.

1 Le Port has its own unique D-Day history. Located in the heart of the area where the American paratroopers fought off the German counter-attacks against the Utah Beachhead, the property's position, right upon the initial front line meant it was used as a makeshift aid station to treat over a dozen wounded paratroopers.

One of the paratroopers brought to 1 Le Port was Ray C. Kennedy, a twenty-six year old Texan Corporal serving with the 82nd Airborne Division.  Kennedy had been shot in the chest as he descended to earth before being guided by a medic to 1 Le Port. The battle intensified around Le Port meaning Ray Kennedy was unable to be evacuated. Unfortunately Ray's wounds were too severe and he died on the 8th June. Corporal Ray C. Kennedy is today buried within the American Cemetery overlooking Omaha Beach at Colleville sur Mer (Block A, Row 15, Grave 28).

Today, the 350 year old property of 1 Le Port is full of character and very comfortable. However, it is impossible not to contemplate the same building back then and imagine what those wounded warriors would have seen at what is today such a peaceful location, a world away from the trauma of battle.